Here are a couple of business decisions we’ve made recently, and our reasoning behind them.

Hours:

When we first opened, it was hit or miss on how many people might show up during the evening. In the early days, we might not have a soul step through the door after 7PM, and with that kind of uncertainty, it was hard to know how late to keep the lights on. Thus came our use of the word, “late” in the explanation of our hours. 7am to Late was how we explained it to people, and it worked fine for that season, but eventually that designation began to hurt more than help.

“How late is late?” was the common inquiry, and soon we found out how confusing that sounded. So this week we have decided to commit to dedicated hours for the sake of clarity, so our customer can make a better decision on coming to our place for food and drink. We open at 7am every day, and will close our kitchen at 9pm on Monday through Thursday, and 10pm on Friday and Saturday nights. Our bar will plan to stay open an hour later, or until you decide to take the conversation elsewhere.

Lesson learned here: Commit to what you want your customer to expect from you, regardless if they request it or not. Build it, and they will come.

Local sourcing:

I am working with more diligence to figure out how to locally source 100% of my protein. The chicken puzzle has been solved, thanks to Sanders Farm and Plum Creek Farms. So now all the chicken I serve, plus their eggs, are raised here right outside Lincoln.

This week I ordered my first hog from TD Niche Pork, who specializes in Berkshire, Mulefoot and Red Wattle. Thursday we took delivery of the entire animal,which included the head and offal, complete with the blue USDA stamp. I broke the primal cuts down into smaller portions ready for slow roasting. It looks like this will enable us to utilize entirely locally raised pork. Now your favorite pork sandwich with apple cream sauce will be built with Berkshire meat, raised about an hour outside of town.

It takes a bit more effort, but again, when you commit to an idea or plan, and stick with it, it will guide you into success. Believe it or not, the hardest component to figure out in the Beef State is a steady supply of beef. Its mainly a storage issue, as I am limited on where I can store what I need. I hope to have this one solved by Spring.

Sticking to the plan

2 thoughts on “Sticking to the plan

  • March 20, 2010 at 3:08 am
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    I so greatly appreciate the local sourcing!

  • March 29, 2010 at 4:15 am
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    I second what Laura said.

    "Now your favorite pork sandwich with apple cream sauce" Man, that sounds good! You are making me hungry.

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